Business Briefing January 2021

Welcome to the January 2021 edition of the Farm Consultancy Group Business Briefing Newsletter.   In this issue you will find articles on Thawing & Preparing Semen for Artificial Insemination, Trace Element Deficiency in Livestock, FCG Accounting and Farm Accounts, Dry Matter Intakes and many more...

Thawing & Preparing Semen for Artificial Insemination? – Wesley Habershon (Chippenham)

Sometimes it is the small errors which cost us dearly particularly when it comes to fertility.  Many factors affect fertility, but you can do everything right but if the Sperm is dead, it’s dead.

Below I have constructed a protocol sheet to work with your Artificial Insemination (A.I.) courses and training you have been on.   Read more...

Trace Element Deficiency in Livestock – George Drewett (Chippenham)

Many clients have been experiencing trace element deficiency within livestock recently.  Copper, cobalt, selenium and iodine are essential trace elements required by cattle and sheep.

Clay soils generally have higher trace element levels than sandy soils.  Read more...

FCG Accounting and Farm Accounts – Charles Holt (Lincoln)

Our Farm Accounts software goes from strength to strength.  If good reports from your present accounts system (including automatic Comparable Dairy Farm Profit calculations on a monthly basis) are not available to you, contact us urgently.  Our Farm Accounts software can produce this for you monthly, very easily.  Read more...

Dry Matter Intakes - Phil Cooper (Sherborne)

It is important to ensure that your cows are eating as much forage as possible and that design faults or lack of space in your feed areas are not limiting the cow’s intake.  A lack of space can lead to timid cows and heifers being bullied and prevented from eating until older, more aggressive cows have finished.   Read more...

Reducing the Risk of Breaching Cross Compliance Rules - Emily Wynder (Sherborne)

 It is important to reduce the risk of any breaches or mistakes which can cause penalties on your farm support payments (including BPS).

Important dates to be aware of for January 2021: Read more...

Improving an Existing Building into an Efficient Calf Rearing Unit - Mark Yearsley (Sherborne)

I was approached by a client to advise on how they could convert an existing building into a functional calf shed for their 300-cow block calving herd.  The focus is to rear their heifer calves in the building and bull calves would be reared in hutches.  Read more...

New Cross-Compliance Rules Published - Charles Holt (Lincoln)

Defra has produced new rules for 2021 on cross-compliance for England.  They aim to provide a simpler and less punitive regime.  More reliance on warning letters is to be taken, with a less stringent application of fines and similar penalties.  I have had a very swift look through it, and all the GAECs and SMRs still seem to be there.   Read more

RPA – BPS & CSS Update - Sophie Cahill (Sherborne)

The Countryside Stewardship and Environmental Stewardship payment window for 2020 revenue claims runs from the beginning of December 2020 to the end of June 2021.

Countryside Stewardship Capital Claims – Remember to complete all capital works within two years of the agreement start date.  All work must comply with the agreement and must be paid for, before making a claim.  Read more...

Soil Management - Phil Cooper (Sherborne)

Sustainable soil management is becoming an increasingly important topic for farmers and landowners to consider.  It will form part of the up and coming ELM scheme with payments being offered for carbon storage, reducing erosion, preventing flooding and increasing organic matter.  Read more...

Less Cows, Less Stress, More Profit! – Gerard Finnan (Sherborne)

The above statement doesn’t seem logical but quite often is true in the context of over stocked buildings, farms or land.  We see more problems where farms are overstocked causing cashflow problems, livestock health issues, labour efficiency and retention issues and the hidden livestock productivity losses.  Very often we see dairy farmers sell 5% of the herd as cull cows and the milk production remains the same after they leave the herd.  What does that say about the management of the herd?  Read more...

Soil Care After Maize - Tom Malleson (Sherborne)

A relatively early and kind maize harvest has left soils in better shape than last year’s mud bath.  However, leaving bare soil over winter is never a good thing as it results in:

  • Erosion risk
  • Nutrient leaching
  • Loss of soil biology due to the absence of living roots Read more...
Posted in Business Briefing.